Cancer Care Centers of Brevard Hosts Fatigue Management Workshop

By  //  July 24, 2013

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fatigue common side effect of cancer

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Caner Care Centers of Brevard doctors (from left to right) include, Giuseppe Palermo, Daljit S. Saini, V. Pavan Kancharla, Carl Tahn, Diely Pichardo, Fe V.S.J. Pancito, Germaine Blaine, Craig Badolato, Rahul Chopra, Ravi Shankar and Todd V. Panarese. (CancerCareBrevard.com image)

BREVARD COUNTY • MELBOURNE, FLORIDA – The Fatigue Management Institute of Florida Institute of Technology to Provide Latest Techniques and Lifestyle Changes to Fight Fatigue during Three-Session Workshop on July 12, 19 and 26

In its continued efforts to educate the community about cancer and its effects, Cancer Care Centers of Brevard, CCCB, is hosting the Fatigue Management Institute of Florida Institute of Technology who will provide a three-session Cancer Fatigue Management Workshop on Friday, July 12th, July 19th and July 26th from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. (SpaceCoastMedicine.com Image)

In its continued efforts to educate the community about cancer and its effects, Cancer Care Centers of Brevard, CCCB, is hosting the Fatigue Management Institute of Florida Institute of Technology who will provide a three-session Cancer Fatigue Management Workshop on Friday, July 12th, July 19th and July 26th from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. (SpaceCoastMedicine.com Image)

According to the American Cancer Society, ACS, cancer-related fatigue is the most common side effect of cancer and cancer treatment.

Research suggests that anywhere between 70% and 100% of cancer patients getting treatment have fatigue.

And about 30 to 50 percent of cancer survivors have said that their fatigue lasts for months or even years after they finish treatment.

In its continued efforts to educate the community about cancer and its effects, Cancer Care Centers of Brevard, CCCB, is hosting the Fatigue Management Institute of Florida Institute of Technology who will provide a three-session Cancer Fatigue Management Workshop on Friday, July 12th, July 19th and July 26th from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.

The free workshop will be held at CCCB located at 1430 Pine Street in Melbourne.

FATIGUE MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE

Open to the public, the Fatigue Management Institute will educate and answer questions about cancer-related fatigue and techniques and lifestyle changes to more effectively manage the condition during and after treatment.

Dr. Ravi Shankar

Dr. Ravi Shankar

“With the emotional and physical toll cancer takes on patients, it is extremely important for patients to discuss their fatigue with their nurse or doctor so that we can prescribe an action plan to help them remain strong in both body and mind,” said Ravi Shankar, M.D., radiation oncologist and medical director of CCCB.

The ACS describes fatigue as a common side effect of many cancer treatments like chemotherapy, radiation, stem cell transplant, and immunotherapy. These treatments often kill fast growing healthy cells, especially the cells in the bone marrow that make blood.

As a result, this causes fatigue because red blood cells carry oxygen to fuel all the cells in the body. Too few red blood cells (anemia) mean too little energy to meet the body’s needs.

TIPS FOR MANAGING FATIGUE

Sometimes it’s hard even for the doctor to figure out exactly what’s causing a person’s fatigue. Still, a program of regular exercise, managing your stress, and finding ways to deal with anxiety and depression seem to help most people deal with fatigue.

“With the emotional and physical toll cancer takes on patients, it is extremely important for patients to discuss their fatigue with their nurse or doctor so that we can prescribe an action plan to help them remain strong in both body and mind,”

Treating sleep problems and correcting nutrition problems can help fatigue, too. Keep in mind that it may take up to eight weeks of treatment before you notice your fatigue getting better, but for some people it happens faster.

• Save your energy
• Use distractions like listening to music, visiting with friends or reading a book
• Use attention-restoring activities like walking in a park, sitting in a peaceful setting, and gardening
• Reduce stress by talking about it in support groups and learning relaxation exercises
• Exercise your body by participating in aerobic and strength-building exercise programs (discuss with doctor prior to beginning any exercise program)
• Get nutrition counseling
• Improve sleep

For more information about the event and to reserve a seat, call 321-223-3622 or visit CancerCareBrevard.com


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