Sheriff Wayne Ivey Talks About Personal Safety

By  //  October 1, 2013

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SHERIFF'S WEEKLY CRIME TIP

ABOVE VIDEO: Brevard County Sheriff Wayne Ivey has been a law enforcement officer for over three decades. Sheriff Ivey’s background in law enforcement is inclusive of Management, Criminal Investigations, Narcotics, Patrol Services, Public Integrity Investigations, and Corrections. Wayne and several other BCSO officials discuss how to stay safe in your community.

BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA — This week we will continue our series on personal safety with another “Crime Tip” that discusses how to use our mind to avoid ever being in a violent encounter.

Using an elevator can sometimes put us in an uncomfortable environment or in direct contact with a potential attacker. While taking the stairs is always an option, most of us will end up taking the elevator and having to face the threat that can be the result of someone else being on the elevator with us. (Shutterstock image)

Using an elevator can sometimes put us in an uncomfortable environment or in direct contact with a potential attacker. While taking the stairs is always an option, most of us will end up taking the elevator and having to face the threat that can be the result of someone else being on the elevator with us. (Shutterstock image)

Throughout our lives as we attend various events, travel to different destinations on business or pleasure, or even when coming and going from our residence in condos or apartments we are often required to use an elevator.

Using an elevator can sometimes put us in an uncomfortable environment or in direct contact with a potential attacker. While taking the stairs is always an option, most of us will end up taking the elevator and having to face the threat that can be the result of someone else being on the elevator with us.

A POTENTIAL ATTACKER

The first thing to consider is what your actions will be if you are waiting on the elevator and when the elevator doors open to offer entry there is a potential attacker on the elevator.

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BCSO can be reached at any time at 911. (BCSO image)

Before we consider what we would do, I believe we have to take a moment and define what a “potential attacker” looks like. Most people think that the attacker is dressed or appears in such a manner that we immediately look at them and know they are a violent criminal.

The reality is that today’s criminals, in most cases, try to not appear unordinary or out of place so as to lower your concerns.

Since the potential attacker could be wearing a suit, a casual outfit, or even have someone with them that makes them appear non-threatening we must assume that everyone is a potential threat and gauge our actions accordingly.

USING AN ELEVATOR

When faced with using an elevator please consider the following safety measures and use them to help keep yourself from being attacked by a violent offender:

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When faced with using an elevator please consider the following safety measures and use them to help keep yourself from being attacked by a violent offender: When getting on the elevator never get on the elevator with a stranger. (Shutterstock image)

When getting on the elevator never get on the elevator with a stranger.

While you don’t have to give the person a reason why you are not getting on the elevator its always great to be prepared with remarks that can also help to protect you.

I like to hear our citizens tell the waiting person on the elevator that they are waiting on someone, they forgot something, or even just simply tell them to go ahead with no explanation.

NEVER TURN YOUR BACK

If you do decide to get on the elevator never turn your back to the potential attacker.

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Always face the attacker and when possible actually engage them in conversation. By doing so you show strength and not fear and also have the opportunity to once again demonstrate you are a “hard” target and not a “soft” target. (Shutterstock image)

Always face the attacker and when possible actually engage them in conversation.

By doing so you show strength and not fear and also have the opportunity to once again demonstrate you are a “hard” target and not a “soft” target.

Additionally, if you turn your back to them they have an advantage when trying to attack you.

By looking at them you also have an opportunity to mentally document their appearance and dress in the event an attack is attempted.

If you are already on the elevator and an unknown person gets on the elevator with you I would prefer to see you exit the elevator.

EXIT THE ELEVATOR

You can always tell them you forgot something or even that you missed your floor. I don’t really care if you tell them you are on probation and not allowed to be around humans as long as you get off the elevator and into a safe environment.

THE GIFT OF FEAR

In the event that you do find yourself on the elevator with a stranger or person who causes your “gift of fear” to engage, make sure that you position yourself near the control buttons of the elevator and immediately locate the “Emergency” button in case you need to press the button to summons help.

In the event that you do find yourself on the elevator with a stranger or person who causes your “gift of fear” to engage, make sure that you position yourself near the control buttons of the elevator and immediately locate the “Emergency” button in case you need to press the button to summons help.

Of course the best safety measure we can have is to try and always have someone that is entering and leaving a building with us.

There is always safety in numbers and having someone with you is an immediate tool to help protect you.

As always thank you for taking the time to read our Crime Prevention information and for sharing our weekly tips with your friends and family. Remember, you are an extension of our agency and are helping to save a life every time you share vital crime prevention information.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Brevard County Sheriff Wayne Ivey has been a law enforcement officer for over three decades. Sheriff Ivey is a graduate of the FBI National Academy and has a Bachelor’s Degree from Daytona State College in Management and Supervision. Sheriff Ivey’s background in law enforcement is inclusive of Management, Criminal Investigations, Narcotics, Patrol Services, Public Integrity Investigations, and Corrections.

Sheriff Wayne Ivey

Prior to being elected in 2012, Sheriff Ivey served the citizens of the State of Florida as a Resident Agent in Charge for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. As a member of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Sheriff Ivey developed and created the country’s first ever statewide Task Force on Identity Theft.

That same year the Task Force was named one of the top five most innovative programs in the country by the International Association of Chiefs of Police and investigated approximately 44 million dollars in fraud cases.

Additionally, as a member of FDLE, Sheriff Ivey created the Child Abduction Response Team (C.A.R.T) that re-defined the way Child Abduction cases are conducted throughout the country today. The program was later selected as the most innovative program in the country by the International Association of Chiefs of Police and is now used as a nationwide model in the response and investigation of child abductions.

Sheriff Ivey has testified before the United States Congress on law enforcement related matters and has extensive experience in the area of Public Integrity Investigations. Sheriff Ivey was honored as the Florida Department of Law Enforcement’s Special Agent of the Year (1996) and was also recognized by the Commissioner of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for his Outstanding Contributions to Criminal Justice. In August of 2011 Sheriff Ivey was honored by the National Organization of Victims Advocacy for his work at the national level as an advocate of victim’s rights and protection.

Sheriff Ivey speaks regularly on topics such as Identity Theft, Crime in America, Human Trafficking, Domestic Violence, and Self Defense through Mental Preparedness. Sheriff Ivey firmly believes that Crime Prevention and Education are vital to reduce our crime rate and protect our community.


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