This Morning’s Partial Solar Eclipse Stunning

By  //  November 3, 2013

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WEIRD AND DRAMATIC SPECTACLE

This morning's partial solar eclipse began this morning at 6:05 a.m. (Image by Brice Rosenfeld)

This morning’s partial solar eclipse on the Space Coast began this morning at 6:05 a.m. This image was captured by Brice Rosenfeld of Cape Canaveral at 6:45 a.m.

BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA – A total solar eclipse occurred this morning at 6:05 a.m. and it was one of the rare hybrid or Annular/Total eclipses in which some sections of the path are Annular while other parts are Total, with a magnitude of 1.0159.

This is an overview map of this morning's annular and total solar eclipse, a hybrid solar eclipse, and shows the path of the event. (Eclipse-Maps.com)

This is an overview map of this morning’s annular and total solar eclipse, a hybrid solar eclipse, and shows the path of the event. (Eclipse-Maps.com)

Totality was visible from the northern Atlantic Ocean (East of Florida) to Africa (Gabon (landfall), R. Congo, DR Congo, Uganda), with maximum of 1 minute and 39 seconds visible from the Atlantic Ocean south of Ivory Coast and Ghana.

The hybrid eclipse of 2013 was visible from within a thin corridor, which traverses the North Atlantic and equatorial Africa. A partial eclipse is seen within the much broader path of the Moon’s penumbral shadow, which includes eastern North America, northern South America, southern Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

The path of the Moon’s shadow began in the North Atlantic approximately 1,000 km due east of Jacksonville, Florida. From the central line, a 4 second annular eclipse is visible at sunrise (11:05 UT). As the shadow races forward, the narrow 4 km wide path rapidly shrinks to zero and the eclipse changes from annular to total.

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 (Image by Brice Rosenfeld)

(Image by Brice Rosenfeld)


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