Scientists Tagging Sharks in Gulf to Predict Hurricanes

By  //  May 22, 2014

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50 Fish Tagged Including Tarpon, Sharks & Tuna

Image courtesy of Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science

Image courtesy of Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science

MIAMI, FLORIDA — The University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science is tagging and tracking sharks, tarpon and tuna with the hope of utilizing the data to better predict hurricane intensity.

According to the university, devices were put there by researchers at the University of Miami who have tagged a total of 750 animals in the past 10 years to record water temperature and salinity at different depths.

Marine Bilogist Jerald Ault told the Houston Chronicle:

Jerald Ault

Jerald Ault

“The fish act as biological sensors,” Ault said. “The fish dive, so they create a vertical picture of what the water temperature looks like. That vertical picture generates a figure for Ocean Heat Content or OHC, the critical statistic you need to understand when forecasting the strength of a storm.”

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