Brevard County Sheriff Wayne Ivey’s Weekly Crime Tip

By  //  August 19, 2014

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As Law Enforcement officers, one of the things they know is that associations can bring both positive and negative influences. That’s why Sheriff Wayne Ivey wants to focus this week’s Crime Prevention Message on making sure that we remind our children to make the very best of choices when deciding who they want to choose as their friends.

BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA — This week our children head back to school and will be spending the majority of their day with old friends and new acquaintances.

With Brevard County Public schools starting yesterday, Wayne Ivey would like to thank the City of Cape Canaveral for spreading the word to help keep our kids safe. (BCSO image)

With Brevard County Public schools starting yesterday, Wayne Ivey would like to thank the City of Cape Canaveral for spreading the word to help keep our kids safe. (BCSO image)

As Law Enforcement officers, one of the things we know is that associations can bring both positive and negative influences. That’s why I want to focus this week’s Crime Prevention Message on making sure that we remind our children to make the very best of choices when deciding who they want to choose as their friends.

PARENTS:

1) Keep in mind that you are the Chief Law Enforcement Officer in your child’s life with the full authority to hold them accountable for their actions! Tough loving your children is one of the most difficult things you will ever have to do, but is no where near as difficult as going to visit them in jail or at the cemetery.

In almost all states (including Florida), it is law to stop for a stopped child-carrying bus whether you are approaching or are behind the bus on a non-divided roadway. On a divided highway, you do not have to stop for a stopped school bus, even if the lights are flashing, as long as you are in the opposing traffic lanes.

In almost all states (including Florida), it is law to stop for a stopped child-carrying bus whether you are approaching or are behind the bus on a non-divided roadway. On a divided highway, you do not have to stop for a stopped school bus, even if the lights are flashing, as long as you are in the opposing traffic lanes.

2) Always make sure you know who your child is hanging out with, both in person and on-line. If you don’t know the person then get to know them. Meet their parents, and equally as important, meet their friends. If you don’t like them, there is probably a reason why.

3) Remember you can’t be your child’s best friend and parent! At this point in their life, they need a parent that guides them along the right course of picking a best friend and in understanding that the are always consequences for their actions.

4) As a parent you are not only the Chief Law Enforcement Officer in their lives, but are also the most visible and constant role model they have. Discuss with them how you chose your friends and explain what happens when you hang with the wrong crowd.

5) Make sure your child knows they can talk to you about their associations and problems even when they have made a mistake. If they can’t turn to you, then who will they turn to?

KIDS:

The following five things were repeatedly reinforced to me by my parents when I was growing up as things to consider when making decisions:

Sheriff Wayne Ivey hopes everyone has a great school year and reaches every goal they have set for themselves in the coming year.

Sheriff Wayne Ivey hopes everyone has a great school year and reaches every goal they have set for themselves in the coming year.

1) Know that poor decisions today can haunt you the rest of your life

2) Instead of trying to have a whole bunch of friends, look for friends that care a whole bunch

3) Never give in to peer pressure, but instead give others peer pressure to always do the right thing

4) Live each day by the “Man In The Mirror” test. As long as you can look the person in the mirror and be proud of what you see you are doing okay

5) Always know you can turn to your parents for anything. They may get angry, be disappointed, and even give consequences for your actions, but you will never find anyone on earth who loves you more than your parents

Brevard County Sheriff Lauches New Crime Fighting AppRelated Story:
Brevard County Sheriff Lauches New Crime Fighting App

I hope everyone has a great school year and reaches every goal they have set for themselves in the coming year.

Thank you for your incredible support of our agency and for sharing this important information with your children and your family.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Brevard County Sheriff Wayne Ivey has been a law enforcement officer for over three decades. Sheriff Ivey is a graduate of the FBI National Academy and has a Bachelor’s Degree from Daytona State College in Management and Supervision. Sheriff Ivey’s background in law enforcement is inclusive of Management, Criminal Investigations, Narcotics, Patrol Services, Public Integrity Investigations, and Corrections.

Sheriff Wayne Ivey

Prior to being elected in 2012, Sheriff Ivey served the citizens of the State of Florida as a Resident Agent in Charge for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. As a member of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Sheriff Ivey developed and created the country’s first ever statewide Task Force on Identity Theft.

That same year the Task Force was named one of the top five most innovative programs in the country by the International Association of Chiefs of Police and investigated approximately 44 million dollars in fraud cases. Additionally, as a member of FDLE, Sheriff Ivey created the Child Abduction Response Team (C.A.R.T) that re-defined the way Child Abduction cases are conducted throughout the country today.

Brevard County Sheriff Wayne Ivey has been a law enforcement officer for over three decades. Sheriff Ivey is a graduate of the FBI National Academy and has a Bachelor’s Degree from Daytona State College in Management and Supervision. Sheriff Ivey’s background in law enforcement is inclusive of Management, Criminal Investigations, Narcotics, Patrol Services, Public Integrity Investigations, and Corrections.

The program was later selected as the most innovative program in the country by the International Association of Chiefs of Police and is now used as a nationwide model in the response and investigation of child abductions.

Sheriff Ivey has testified before the United States Congress on law enforcement related matters and has extensive experience in the area of Public Integrity Investigations. Sheriff Ivey was honored as the Florida Department of Law Enforcement’s Special Agent of the Year (1996) and was also recognized by the Commissioner of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for his Outstanding Contributions to Criminal Justice. In August of 2011 Sheriff Ivey was honored by the National Organization of Victims Advocacy for his work at the national level as an advocate of victim’s rights and protection.

Sheriff Ivey speaks regularly on topics such as Identity Theft, Crime in America, Human Trafficking, Domestic Violence, and Self Defense through Mental Preparedness. Sheriff Ivey firmly believes that Crime Prevention and Education are vital to reduce our crime rate and protect our community.


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