SpaceX Launch Scrubbed, Liftoff Now Set For Friday

By  //  January 6, 2015

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launch aborted due to technical difficulty

The SpaceX Falcon 9 launch scheduled for this morning at 6:20 a.m. EST aborted with one minute, 21 seconds left on the countdown clock. A thrust vector control actuator for the Falcon 9’s second stage failed to perform as expected, resulting in a launch abort. (NASA.gov image)

The SpaceX Falcon 9 launch scheduled for this morning at 6:20 a.m. EST aborted with one minute, 21 seconds left on the countdown clock. A thrust vector control actuator for the Falcon 9’s second stage failed to perform as expected, resulting in a launch abort. (NASA.gov image)

BREVARD COUNTY • CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, FLORIDA – The SpaceX Falcon 9 launch scheduled for this morning at 6:20 a.m. EST aborted with one minute, 21 seconds left on the countdown clock.

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A thrust vector control actuator for the Falcon 9’s second stage failed to perform as expected, resulting in a launch abort.

SpaceX is evaluating the issue and will determine the next opportunity to launch its fifth commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station.

The next available launch opportunity is Friday, Jan. 9.

ORIGINAL STORY: LIVE STREAM: SpaceX Dragon Falcon 9 Launch

BREVARD COUNTY • CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, FLORIDA – After five successful missions to the International Space Station, including four official resupply missions for NASA, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft are set to liftoff from Launch Complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for their fifth official Commercial Resupply mission to the orbiting lab.

The launch is currently targeted for Tuesday, January 6 at 6:20 a.m. EST. The live launch webcast will begin at approximately 6 a.m. EST.

If all goes as planned, Dragon will arrive at the Space Station approximately two days after liftoff.

Dragon is expected to return to Earth four-and-a-half weeks later for a parachute-assisted splashdown off the coast of southern California.

Dragon is the only operational spacecraft capable of returning a significant amount of supplies back to Earth, including experiments.

Drone spaceport ship heads to its hold position in the Atlantic to prepare for a rocket landing. (SpaceX image)

SpaceX is gearing up for its next big launch. According to Elon Musk, SpaceX’s drone spaceport ship, above, has left the dock and headed to its hold position in the Atlantic Ocean. On Tuesday, the company will launch its Falcon 9 rocket and attempt to land it on the 30,000 square-foot ship, with engineers attempting a landing accuracy of 10 meters on each side. SpaceX is the first company to attempt a rocket landing of this scope, although it has never successfully carried one out. (SpaceX image)

SpaceX CRS-5 is the fifth of 12 SpaceX flights NASA has contracted with the company to resupply the space station. It will be the sixth trip by a Dragon spacecraft to the station.

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The Dragon cargo spacecraft atop the Falcon 9 is loaded with more than 3,700 pounds of scientific experiments, technology demonstrations and supplies, including critical materials to support 256 science and research investigations that will take place on the station during ISS Expeditions 42 and 43.


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