LIVE: Blood Moon Lunar Eclipse Begins At 6:16 a.m. Today

By  //  April 4, 2015

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total eclipse will last only five minutes

LIVE STREAM: On Saturday morning, not long before sunrise, the bright full moon over North America should turn a lovely shade of celestial red during a total lunar eclipse. Tune in to SpaceCoastDaily.com starting at 6 a.m. to see the eclipse live.

NASA — On April 4, not long before sunrise, the bright full moon over North America should turn a lovely shade of celestial red during a total lunar eclipse, which will last only five minutes.

Here’s the schedule:

Lunar Eclipse, April 4, 2015 Eastern Daylight Time, *a.m.)  Universal Time
Partial eclipse begins 6:16 EDT 10:15:45 UT
Totality begins 7:58 EDT 11:57:54 UT
Greatest eclipse 8:00 EDT 12:00:15 UT
Totality ends 8:03 EDT 12:02:37 UT
Partial eclipse ends 9:45 EDT 13:44:46 UT
     
Moonset 6:53 EDT for Wash., D.C.
6:34 CDT for HSV, AL
7:13         for Houston
6:15 MST for Tucson
6:44 PDT for Los Angeles

A world map of eclipse visibility is available HERE.

This eclipse marks the third in a series of four lunar eclipses in a row, known as a “tetrad.”

The first in the series occurred on April 15, 2014, with the second in the tetrad of eclipses in September of 2014, and the final will be September 28.

For a total lunar eclipse to happen, the Moon must be full, which means it is directly opposite the Sun, with Earth in between.

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The eclipse happens when the Moon moves into the shadow cast by the Sun shining on Earth.

We don’t have an eclipse every month because sometimes the Moon is above the shadow, sometimes below.

During the eclipse, the Moon often looks reddish because sunlight has passed through Earth’s atmosphere, which filters out most of its blue light.

This eerie, harmless effect has earned the tongue-in-cheek nickname “blood moon.”

On April 4, not long before sunrise, the bright full moon over North America should turn a lovely shade of celestial red during a total lunar eclipse. (NASA.gov image)

On April 4, not long before sunrise, the bright full moon over North America should turn a lovely shade of celestial red during a total lunar eclipse. (NASA.gov image)

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