VIDEO: NWS Hurricane Preparedness Week: Day 1, Hurricane Basic Terms

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ARE YOU READY FOR HURRICANE SEASON?

ABOVE VIDEO: NHC Hurricane Specialist Unit Branch Chief James Franklin provides an overview of the hurricane hazards and the importance of not using the seasonal outlook to prepare for the season.

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE • MELBOURNE, FLORIDA – To start off Hurricane Preparedness Week we will talk about a few basic terms.

The word “Tropical Cyclone” includes all rotating, organized systems over tropical or subtropical waters, including tropical storms, hurricanes, and typhoons.

Most tropical waters across the world see tropical cyclones, and many areas have more on average than the Atlantic waters.

Hundreds of tropical waves and disturbances occur over the tropical Atlantic each year, but only a few become organized enough to be referred to as a “Tropical Depression.”

Once a system becomes a depression, it is assigned a number by the National Hurricane Center and officially tracked.

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If winds reach 39 mph, it becomes a “Tropical Storm” and is assigned a name based off the list for that particular year.

We’ve used Ana already this year, and the next name will be Bill. Storms that reach 75 mph or greater become

“Hurricanes” and those that reach sustained wind speeds of 115 mph or greater are “Major Hurricanes.”

The word “Tropical Cyclone” includes all rotating, organized systems over tropical or subtropical waters, including tropical storms, hurricanes, and typhoons. (NWS image)

The word “Tropical Cyclone” includes all rotating, organized systems over tropical or subtropical waters, including tropical storms, hurricanes, and typhoons. (NWS image)


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