VIDEO: U.S. SpaceX Dragon Spacecraft Returns With Critical NASA Research

By  //  May 22, 2015

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ABOVE VIDEO: After almost five weeks at the International Space Station, the unpiloted U.S. SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft departed the ISS on May 21 to begin the journey back to Earth. Dragon brought back with it, more than 3,000 pounds of experiments and cargo for researchers and station program personnel. (NASA Video)

NASA – SpaceX’s Dragon cargo spacecraft splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at 12:42 p.m. EDT Thursday with almost 3,100 pounds of NASA cargo from the International Space Station, including research on how spaceflight and microgravity affect the aging process and bone health.

Dragon is the only space station resupply spacecraft able to return a significant amount of cargo to Earth.

It is the U.S. company’s sixth NASA-contracted commercial resupply mission to the station and carried more than two tons of supplies and scientific cargo when it lifted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on April 14.

NASA also has contracted with American companies SpaceX and Boeing to develop their Crew Dragon and CST-100, respectively, to once again transport astronauts to and from the orbiting laboratory from the United States in 2017.

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SpaceX’s Dragon cargo spacecraft splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at 12:42 p.m. EDT Thursday with almost 3,100 pounds of NASA cargo from the International Space Station. (NASA Image)

The returning Space Aging study, for example, examines the effects of spaceflight on the aging of roundworms, widely used as a model for larger organisms.

By growing millimeter-long roundworms on the space station, researchers can observe physiological changes that may affect the rate at which organisms age.

This can be applied to changes observed in astronauts, as well, particularly in developing countermeasures before long-duration missions.

Julie Robinson

Julie Robinson

“Spaceflight-induced health changes, such as decreases in muscle and bone mass, are a major challenge facing our astronauts,” said Julie Robinson, NASA’s chief scientist for the International Space Station Program Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

“We investigate solutions on the station not only to keep astronauts healthy as the agency considers longer space exploration missions but also to help those on Earth who have limited activity as a result of aging or illness.”

Also returned on Dragon were samples for the Osteocytes and Mechanomechano-transduction (Osteo-4) investigation.

Researchers with Osteo-4 will observe the effects of microgravity on the function of osteocytes, the most common cells in bone.

Understanding the effects of microgravity on osteocytes will be critical as astronauts plan for future missions that require longer exposure to microgravity, including the NASA’s journey to Mars.

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The results derived from this study also could have implications on Earth for patients suffering bone disorders related to disuse or immobilization, as well as metabolic diseases such as osteoporosis.

Equipment and data from the Special Purpose Inexpensive Satellite (SpinSat) investigation also made the trip back to Earth. The SpinSat study tested how a spherical satellite, measuring 22 inches in diameter, moves and positions itself in space using new thruster technology.

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