Dr. Mark Pinsky To Host Informative Osteoporosis Seminar June 11

By  //  June 10, 2015

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AT One Senior Place

Dr. Mark Pinsky will host an informative seminar 5:30 – 7 p.m. on Thursday, June 11 at One Senior Place, located at 8085 Spyglass Hill Road in Viera, to teach you how to keep your bone healthy.

Dr. Mark Pinsky will host an informative seminar 5:30 – 7 p.m. on Thursday, June 11 at One Senior Place, located at 8085 Spyglass Hill Road in Viera, to teach you how to keep your bone healthy.

Sticks and stones may break your bones, but what about a sneeze?

Dr. Mark Pinsky will host an informative seminar 5:30 – 7 p.m. on Thursday, June 11 at One Senior Place, located at 8085 Spyglass Hill Road in Viera to teach you how to keep your bone healthy.

Dr. Mark Pinsky will host an informative seminar 5:30 – 7 p.m. on Thursday, June 11 at One Senior Place, located at 8085 Spyglass Hill Road in Viera to teach you how to keep your bone healthy.

Dr. Mark Pinsky will host an informative seminar 5:30 – 7 p.m. on Thursday, June 11 at One Senior Place, located at 8085 Spyglass Hill Road in Viera, to teach you how to keep your bone healthy.

Did you know that almost 50 percent of women and 25 percent of men over the age of 50 will break a bone as a result of osteoporosis?

And if left untreated, your bones can weaken to a point where a simple jerking motion or even a sneeze can cause serious bone breakage.

The good news is that many people can prevent and control bone diseases including osteoporosis through easy lifestyle changes.

You and your guests are invited to to learn some valuable tips that can maximize your bone strength.

To RSVP call 321-255-2289.

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ABOVE MAP: Dr. Mark Pinsky will host an informative seminar 5:30 – 7 p.m. on Thursday, June 11 at One Senior Place, located at 8085 Spyglass Hill Road in Viera to teach you how to keep your bone healthy.

Osteoporosis: Not Just A Female Problem

Osteoporosis is a progressive bone disease characterized by a decrease in bone mass and density resulting in holes in the inner bone architecture, which can lead to an increased risk of fracture. It is primarily associated with older women, however men can also be afflicted with this disease.

Types of Osteoporosis

There are two different categories of osteoporosis. Primary osteoporosis is the result of bone loss that occurs from the decline of hormone function (estrogen in women and testosterone in men), and secondary osteoporosis, which results from certain chronic medical conditions and some medications.

Prevalence,  Cost of Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis affects 8 million women and 2 million men in America. The potential financial and emotional impact of osteoporosis should make it a priority to address, yet less than 50 percent of all women eligible for screening actually have this simple test performed.

In addition, approximately 1 in 2 women will experience an osteoporotic fracture in their lifetime and the estimated annual cost resulting from these fractures is as high as an astounding 18 billion (with a “B”) dollars. To make matters worse, the death rate associated with osteoporotic hip fractures is up to 20 percent in the first year after the fracture. The other major issue associated with these fractures is the debilitating pain they cause, especially compression fractures of the spine.

Identify and Treat Early

So how do we avoid these complications?  Simple, identify those at risk and screen for any early signs of the disease. This means that both patients and physicians must get proactive about screening.

The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force, which provides systematic reviews of evidence of effectiveness, and guidelines for clinical preventive services recommends that all women over 65 years old and women 60-64, who have increased risk factors for fracture, should be screened by DEXA scan, which measures bone density; and that all men 70 years of age and older should also be screened.

However, I believe in a more aggressive screening policy based on the fact that women lose most of their bone density within the first five years after the onset of menopause. As a result, if a woman goes into menopause at age 50, she should be screened by age 55.

The cost of the scan is relatively low when compared with the cost of the complications.  In fact, if a woman has significant risk factors, I might even start screening earlier, but all my female patients are advised on the appropriate conservative measures to reduce the incidence of osteoporosis.

Those at increased risk include ladies who weigh less than 127 pounds, are Caucasian, are of Asian descent, have a history of falling or personal history of fracture, have a primary female relative with osteoporosis, are moderate to heavy alcohol drinkers (greater than 2 drinks per day), use caffeine or tobacco, lead a sedentary lifestyle, and/or have a low calcium or vitamin D level.

Diagnosis of Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is primarily diagnosed by DEXA scan (Dual Energy Xray Absorptiometry). The definition is a T-score of -2.5 or greater for the hip and/or spine when compared to a young, healthy female.  A T-score of 1.0-2.5 is defined as osteopenia or pre-osteoporotic. A significant amount of arthritis may complicate the accurate diagnosis of osteoporosis.

Frequently, the scan will be falsely normal because the scan picks up bone that is scattered about. In such cases where clinical suspicion for osteoporosis is high but the DEXA scan accuracy may be compromised, I believe the practitioner is obligated to use his/her clinical acumen and treat accordingly.

Not Just a Disease of Women

I would be remiss if I didn’t at least expound a little about men and osteoporosis.  One in eight men will have an osteoporotic fracture in their lifetime, and men account for 30 percent of all hip fractures. Even more disconcerting is that men are twice as likely to die from their hip fracture when compared with women.

Unlike women who seldom have secondary causes for osteoporosis, men have secondary causes 50 percent of the time. As a result, men warrant a thorough history and physical and laboratory testing to determine if these factors are present.

In the next issue of Space Coast Medicine and Active Living, Osteoporosis Part II, will address the indications for treatment, as well as both non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments for osteoporosis. Until then, stay active and KEEP MOVING! n

For more information call Dr. Pinsky at 321-255-2289 or log on to MDVIP.com/MarkPinskyDO

ABOUT DR. MARK PINSKY

PINSKY-MARK-260X240-73Dr. Mark Pinsky is an affiliate of MDVIP and is board certified in family medicine by the American Academy of Family Medicine. He completed his doctorate degree from the University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine in Kansas City, Missouri.

His family practice residency was served at the University of Louisville in Kentucky. In addition, Dr. Pinsky completed a sports medicine fellowship in Cleveland, Ohio, with Lutheran Medical Center in conjunction with Horizon Orthopedics, the team physicians for the Cleveland Indians.

He also has a certificate of additional qualifications in sports medicine from the American Academy of Family Practice. Dr. Pinsky speaks nationally for several pharmaceutical companies and serves as the medical director for a home health care agency. Currently he is caring for Viera High athletes and is a partner of Medical Associates of Brevard. To reach Dr. Pinsky, call 321-255-2289.

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