Cape Canaveral To Unveil City’s First Heritage Marker Wednesday At Center Street Park

By  //  December 15, 2015

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Native American burial mounds 1,400 years old

Please join us as we proudly recognize Cape Canaveral's rich history with the unveiling of the City's first Florida Heritage Marker on Wednesday, Dec. 16 at 1 p.m. at Center Street Park.

Please join us as we proudly recognize Cape Canaveral’s rich history with the unveiling of the City’s first Florida Heritage Marker on Wednesday, Dec. 16 at 1 p.m. at Center Street Park.

BREVARD COUNTY • CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA – Please join us as we proudly recognize Cape Canaveral’s rich history with the unveiling of the City’s first Florida Heritage Marker on Wednesday, Dec. 16 at 1 p.m. at Center Street Park.

The Florida Division of Historical Resources has recognized Cape Canaveral’s own “Carter-Fuller Mound Complex” as a significant historical resource for the State of Florida.

Excavated in 1933, this series of Native American burial mounds dates back more than 1,400 years.

To honor the cultural legacy of some of Cape Canaveral’s earliest residents, the Brevard County Historical Commission and the Tourist Development Council have sponsored the acquisition of a State Historical Marker at Center Street Park, near the site of the original excavations.

As the city historian I want to thank the City of Cape Canaveral for pursuing this historical marker project I started back in 2012. We have an ancient history that we can all be proud of.

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I am excited that we can continue with historic preservation in all manners for our community. I’m asking that this event be videotaped for archival purposes so people of future generations will witness this important event.

– Ray Osborne, City of Cape Canaveral Historian

FOR MORE INFORMATION E-MAL info@a1aresearch.com

Historical Marker Text:

Before modern construction, a complex of six burial mounds occupied this location. They were built by the ancestors of the prehistoric Ais Tribe, a group who occupied the Cape Canaveral area at the time of European contact.

Cape-Canavaveral-Marker-325

Before modern construction, a complex of six burial mounds occupied this location. They were built by the ancestors of the prehistoric Ais Tribe, a group who occupied the Cape Canaveral area at the time of European contact. (Image for Space Coast Daily)

Based on pottery styles and the presence of European materials discovered here, the age of these mounds range from AD 600 to the 16th century.

In the 1930s, Dr. George Woodbury, under the direction of the Smithsonian Institutes’s Bureau of Ethnology and the Peabody Museum, initiated a series of archaeological investigations into several American Indian mound sites near here. 

With the help of local laborers provided by the New Deal’s Civil Works Administration, excavations on the properties revealed the remains of more than 100 individuals that included men, women, and children. Along with these burials, dozens of ornamental and utilitarian artifacts made of bone, shell and stone were recovered. 

Many of these artifacts are still housed at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C. and the Peabody Museum in Massachusetts.

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ABOVE MAP: Please join us as we proudly recognize Cape Canaveral’s rich history with the unveiling of the City’s first Florida Heritage Marker on Wednesday, Dec. 16 at 1 p.m. at Center Street Park.


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