Image of the Day: Canaveral National Seashore Sunset

By  //  February 13, 2016

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news from florida fish and wildlife commission

Canaveral National Seashore. Seagrass beds and oyster reefs within Canaveral National Seashore provide food and protection for thousands of estuarine species, including manatees, sea turtles and many fish and invertebrates. Estuaries, the shallow waters where rivers, creeks and streams meet the sea, are important nurseries and homes for marine aquatic life and bird life. (MyFWC image)

Canaveral National Seashore. Seagrass beds and oyster reefs within Canaveral National Seashore provide food and protection for thousands of estuarine species, including manatees, sea turtles and many fish and invertebrates. Estuaries, the shallow waters where rivers, creeks and streams meet the sea, are important nurseries and homes for marine aquatic life and bird life. (MyFWC image)slid

BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA – Seagrass beds and oyster reefs within Canaveral National Seashore provide food and protection for thousands of estuarine species, including manatees, sea turtles and many fish and invertebrates.

Estuaries, the shallow waters where rivers, creeks and streams meet the sea, are important nurseries and homes for marine aquatic life and bird life.

In order to demonstrate support for key federal programs that benefit estuaries and to raise awareness among Congress and the Administration, Restore America’s Estuaries (RAE), National Estuarine Research Reserve Association (NERRA), and the Association of National Estuary Programs (ANEP) are joining forces to celebrate Valentine’s Day through a joint, 3-day “I heart estuaries” campaign.

Cannonball jellyfish cruise through seagrasses in this underwater scene in an Apalachee Bay estuary on north Florida’s Gulf Coast. FWC biologists do annual mapping and monitoring of seagrass. (FWC image)

Cannonball jellyfish cruise through seagrasses in this underwater scene in an Apalachee Bay estuary on north Florida’s Gulf Coast. FWC biologists do annual mapping and monitoring of seagrass. (FWC image)

Demonstrating support for funding key programs like USFWS Coastal Program, EPA’s National Estuary Program, NOAA’s National Estuarine Research Reserve System, and NOAA’s Community-based Restoration Program has never been more important.

This Valentine’s Day, show Congress and the Administration that there is a lot of love for estuaries and let our leaders know that protecting estuaries means protecting our future.

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The 5-acre restored marsh at the Mosquito Lagoon Marine Enhancement Center in New Smyrna Beach is being used as a nursery for aquatic plants that will be shared with other marsh restoration projects. This marsh includes a Living Shoreline Demonstration Area, where visitors can explore alternatives to hard-armored shorelines. (MyFWC image)

The 5-acre restored marsh at the Mosquito Lagoon Marine Enhancement Center in New Smyrna Beach is being used as a nursery for aquatic plants that will be shared with other marsh restoration projects. This marsh includes a Living Shoreline Demonstration Area, where visitors can explore alternatives to hard-armored shorelines. (MyFWC image)

Brown pelicans flock to this small island in an estuary of the Indian River Lagoon. More than a dozen bird species use the island as a rookery, including great egret, snowy egret, tricolored heron, double crested cormorant and pelicans. (MyFWC image)

Brown pelicans flock to this small island in an estuary of the Indian River Lagoon. More than a dozen bird species use the island as a rookery, including great egret, snowy egret, tricolored heron, double crested cormorant and pelicans. (MyFWC image)


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