Florida Fish and Wildlife Researchers Snap Incredible Image Sequence of Right Whale

By  //  March 6, 2016

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most endangered whales in the world

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The Florida Fish and Wildlife right whale researchers took a sequence of the above, and below, photos showing a right whale breaching on Jan. 31, approximately 14 nautical miles off Amelia Island, Florida. (FWC image)

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The Florida Fish and Wildlife right whale researchers took a sequence of the above, and below, photos showing a right whale breaching on Jan. 31, approximately 14 nautical miles off Amelia Island, Florida. (FWC image)

RIGHT-WALE-FWC-580-3

The Florida Fish and Wildlife right whale researchers took a sequence of the above, and below, photos showing a right whale breaching on Jan. 31, approximately 14 nautical miles off Amelia Island, Florida. (FWC image)

RIGHT-WALE-FWC-580-4

The Florida Fish and Wildlife right whale researchers took a sequence of the above photos showing a right whale breaching on Jan. 31, approximately 14 nautical miles off Amelia Island, Florida. (FWC image)

The Florida Fish and Wildlife right whale researchers took a sequence of the above photos showing a right whale breaching on Jan. 31, approximately 14 nautical miles off Amelia Island, Florida.

The reasons for breaching are unknown, but there are a few common theories surrounding this fascinating behavior.

There may be something on their skin they want to shake off, or they may breach to communicate with other whales (breaching is very loud).

A warning of threats or warning to predators is another common theory, along with the simple idea that it’s just fun for them to do.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Officials Notice Right Whale’s Poor HealthRelated Story:
Florida Fish and Wildlife Officials Notice Right Whale’s Poor Health

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