March Equinox Sunday Signals Beginning of Spring In the Northern Hemisphere

By  //  March 20, 2016

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sunrise is earlier now, and nightfall comes later

Spring arrived at 12:30 a.m. Sunday morning when the relative angle of Earth was perpendicular to the Sun (equinox), causing equal incoming solar energy to the Northern and Southern hemispheres - as well as equal day and nighttime. (NWS image)

Spring arrived at 12:30 a.m. Sunday morning when the relative angle of Earth was perpendicular to the Sun (equinox), causing equal incoming solar energy to the Northern and Southern hemispheres – as well as equal day and nighttime. (NOAA/NASA image)

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE • MELBOURNE, FLORIDA – Spring arrived at 12:30 a.m. Sunday morning when the relative angle of Earth was perpendicular to the Sun (equinox), causing equal incoming solar energy to the Northern and Southern hemispheres – as well as equal day and nighttime.

The March equinox signals the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere – earliest spring since 1896 – and autumn in the Southern Hemisphere.

It marks that special moment when the sun crosses the celestial equator going from south to north.

Our sunrise is earlier now, and nightfall comes later. Plants are sprouting. Winds are softening.

For us in the Northern Hemisphere, people are enjoying the warmer days of spring.


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