‘Save the St. Johns 2016 River Tour’ Will Raise Awareness, Set March 22 – April 3

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Together, we can save the St. Johns

In less than a month, a small team of river advocates and I will embark on a journey of the entire 310-mile length of the St. Johns River from the headwaters at Fort Drum to the mouth at the Atlantic Ocean.

In less than a month, a small team of river advocates and I will embark on a journey of the entire 310-mile length of the St. Johns River from the headwaters at Fort Drum to the mouth at the Atlantic Ocean.

We are in the final stages of preparing for the upcoming Save the St. Johns 2016 River Tour.

In less than a month, a small team of river advocates and I will embark on a journey of the entire 310-mile length of the St. Johns River from the headwaters at Fort Drum to the mouth at the Atlantic Ocean.

The Save the St. Johns 2016 River Tour takes place March 22 – April 3.

We are launching this Tour and grassroots initiative, because our river is facing significant threats and is at a critical crossroads. The ecological future of the St. Johns hangs in the balance, and the time is now for citizens to join together to save this magnificent waterway.

Our goal is to raise awareness and engage and activate people and organizations throughout the watershed in a collaborative campaign to protect and restore the St. Johns.

We hope you will join us in this effort.

Designated an American Heritage River, the St. Johns River begins in a large marshy area in Indian River County and flows north 310 miles before turning eastward at Jacksonville to its mouth in the Atlantic Ocean. This makes it the longest river in the state of Florida, as well as the longest river in the United States that generally flows north throughout its entire length. (Wikimedia Commons image)

Designated an American Heritage River, the St. Johns River begins in a large marshy area in Indian River County and flows north 310 miles before turning eastward at Jacksonville to its mouth in the Atlantic Ocean. This makes it the longest river in the state of Florida, as well as the longest river in the United States that generally flows north throughout its entire length. (Wikimedia Commons image)

Here is how you can get involved:

• Join us at one of the various stops and events along the way. One of the highlights will be the Low Country Boil on April 1 at Sadler Point Marina. Click here for a tour schedule.
• Follow us on Facebook and social media, share with friends, and help spread the word. #SJrivertour
• Take the survey and let us know about your priorities and concerns for the St. Johns River.
• Contact your legislators and tell them to protect and restore the St. Johns River.

For more information about the Tour and opportunities to join the team on land or on the water, visit www.savethestjohns.org.

Also, watch the interview with the Orlando Sentinel Editorial Board, where I discuss the Tour and the issues that threaten the future of our river.

The time is now to start building a more informed, vocal, and united group of advocates throughout the river’s watershed. Together, we can save the St. Johns!


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