BREAKING: Data Recorder Located For Last Year’s Sunken Cargo Ship El Faro, Claimed 33 Lives

By  //  April 26, 2016

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Located under 15,000 feet of water

The Coast Guard will suspend the search for possible survivors from the cargo ship El Faro at sunset Wednesday, which is believed to have sunk during Hurricane Joaquin. (MarineTraffic.com image)

The wreckage of the cargo ship El Faro that was lost October 1, 2015 during Hurricane Joaquin was located by the U.S. Navy in about 15,000 feet of water, 35 miles northeast of Crooked Island in the Bahamas, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. (MarineTraffic.com image)

UPDATE: The data recorder for the cargo ship El Faro has been located.

The National Transportation Safety Board announced Tuesday afternoon that it has located the data recorder from the sunken cargo ship in nearly 15,000 feet of water.

Crews are currently working on retrieving the recorder

The data recorder will give more clues as to what happened to the El Faro ship when it sank last year.

The incident claimed 33 men’s lives back on October 1, 2015.

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PREVIOUS STORY: May 26, 2016

(FloridaPolitics.com) – The National Transportation Safety Board is set to resume its search today for the critical data recorder from the sunken El Faro cargo ship.

The 790-foot freighter sank during Hurricane Joaquin on Oct. 1, 2015, after leaving JAXPORT in Jacksonville, bound for San Juan, Puerto Rico. All 33 of the El Faro’s crew died at sea.

The NTSB says purpose of this second search is not only to find the ship’s vessel data recorder, but also better document the wreckage to help determine exactly why and how the ship sank.

In addition to navigational data, the ship’s so-called “black box” also contains voice data.

Sunken Cargo Ship El Faro Found According To National Transportation Safety BoardRelated Story:
Sunken Cargo Ship El Faro Found According To National Transportation Safety Board

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, the top Democrat on the Senate Commerce Committee which oversees the NTSB, has been vocal about the need to keep searching.

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