Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission: Living With Alligators and Crocodiles

By  //  April 4, 2016

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Alligators inhabit all 67 counties in Florida

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As our weather warms up, alligators become more active. By following a few easy safety tips, like swimming only during the day in designated areas and keeping pets and people away from the water’s edge, we can continue to safely coexist with these amazing critters. (MyFWC image)

Alligators have inhabited Florida’s marshes, swamps, rivers and lakes for many centuries, and are found in all 67 counties.

In recent years, Florida has experienced tremendous human population growth. Many residents seek waterfront homes, and increasingly participate in water-related activities. This can result in more frequent alligator-human interactions, and a greater potential for conflict.

While the grin of an American alligator contains 78 to 82 teeth, throughout its life it loses and replaces up to 2,000 to 3,000 teeth.

As our weather warms up, alligators become more active. By following a few easy safety tips, like swimming only during the day in designated areas and keeping pets and people away from the water’s edge, we can continue to safely coexist with these amazing critters.

AMERICAN CROCODILES

American crocodiles primarily are found in south Florida living in brackish and saltwater habitats such as ponds, coves and creeks of mangrove swamps. Recently crocodiles have moved northward within their range and even inland into freshwater areas of southeast Florida. (Wikipedia.org image)

American crocodiles primarily are found in south Florida living in brackish and saltwater habitats such as ponds, coves and creeks of mangrove swamps. Recently crocodiles have moved northward within their range and even inland into freshwater areas of southeast Florida. (Wikipedia.org image)

American crocodiles primarily are found in south Florida living in brackish and saltwater habitats such as ponds, coves and creeks of mangrove swamps. Recently crocodiles have moved northward within their range and even inland into freshwater areas of southeast Florida.

Florida Fish and Wildlife, Cocoa Police Wrestle Down An 8-Foot GatorRelated Story:
Florida Fish and Wildlife, Cocoa Police Wrestle Down An 8-Foot Gator

The American crocodile is an endangered species success story. Since 1975 their numbers have increased from less than 300 to more than 1,500 adults.

Today, they are classified as a threatened species. The number of crocodile complaints has risen as a result of their recovery and the increasing number of people living and recreating in south Florida.

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