UCF RESEARCHER: ‘Coral Zombies’ May Spell Doom For Reefs Around the World

By  //  June 23, 2016

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Delicious Digg This Stumble This

Coral reefs most productive marine ecosystems

ABOVE VIDEO: Coral reefs are an important part of our ecosystem, but they are struggling to survive in our changing oceans. This video gives one suggestion as to how coral reefs may be able to be produced to survive in oceans that are getting warmer and becoming less stable for coral life, leading to “Coral Zombies.” (D News Video)

ORLANDO, FLORIDA – Scientists have known for a while that coral reefs around the world are dying, and in a worst-case scenario they were counting on large, healthy-looking corals to repopulate.

But a new study presented at the 13th International Coral Reef Symposium in Honolulu shows that these seemingly healthy colonies are “Coral Zombies” with no reproductive ability, which makes them useless in a recovery effort.

John Fauth

John Fauth

“It’s pretty discouraging,” said University of Central Florida biologist John E. Fauth, one of the researchers who sampled 34 sites across the Caribbean for the study.

“This is not good news.”

Cheryl M. Woodley, a marine biologist with NOAA’s National Ocean Service led the study, which sampled 327 coral colonies off the coasts of Florida, Puerto Rico, and St. Thomas, St. John and St. Croix in the US. Virgin Islands.

The researchers analyzed the samples to determine the reproductive ability of elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata), which is a threatened species.

In some places – including two sites in the Florida Keys –  the coral had no eggs or sperm. The study suggests that with no ability to propogate, elkhorn corals in those spots will eventually die out – like zombies, they essentially are walking dead.

Two samples from a more remote area in St. Croix found the coral had 100 percent reproduction ability.

“Basically the places with the heaviest tourism had the most severe damage,” Fauth said.

He dove and took samples from all of the Puerto Rican sites in the study, along with marine biologists Michael Nemeth and Katie Flynn.

This study adds to growing evidence that coral reefs frequented by divers are in peril. Last year a study found that oxybenzone, a common UV-filtering compound in sunscreen, is in high concentrations in the waters around the more popular coral reefs in Hawaii and the Caribbean.

The chemical not only kills coral, it causes DNA damage in adult corral and deforms the larval stage, making it unlikely they can develop properly.

A side by side comparison of a healthy portion of the Great Barrier Reef (left), compared to a bleached portion (right). As climate change warms ocean temperatures, coral bleaching is reaching epidemic levels. Left photo by Gary Bell / Oceanwideimages.com. Right photo by Greenpeace / Roger Grace. There are many threats to coral re

A side by side comparison of a healthy portion of the Great Barrier Reef (left), compared to a bleached portion (right). As climate change warms ocean temperatures, coral bleaching is reaching epidemic levels. (Left image by Gary Bell/Oceanwideimages.com, right image by Greenpeace/Roger Grace)

The highest concentrations of oxybenzone were found in reefs most popular with tourists. Fauth was a co-investigator of that 2015 study, which was published in the journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.

Oxybenzone also causes coral bleaching, which is a prime cause of coral mortality worldwide. Corals bleach when they lose or expel the algae that normally live inside them, thus losing a valuable source of nutrition.

In another study presented at the symposium on this week, researchers found the same sunscreen chemical is common in Hawaii, Florida and the U.S. Virgin Islands, and concentrations peak during high tide.

UCF Wins NASA Grant to Study Astronaut’s Mental Wellness On Deep Space MissionsRelated Story:
UCF Wins NASA Grant to Study Astronaut’s Mental Wellness On Deep Space Missions

“It’s almost counterintuitive,” said Fauth, who is a co-author of that study as well.

“We think that aerosol sunscreen is to blame.” When you spray sunscreen, much of it lands on the sand or water, Fauth said. So when the high tide comes in, it collects all the overspray and pulls it back out to sea.

Together, the two new studies show that coral reefs are in more danger than already thought. Several species of coral are listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Coral reef is one of the major reason people snorkel and dive, to loot at the beauty and color of the reef.

Coral reef is one of the major reasons people snorkel and dive, to loot at the beauty and color of the reef.

“Reproductive failure in Caribbean coral already was identified as a critical factor preventing their recovery. The news that even corals that appear healthy may be incapable of reproducing and that a chemical linked to coral decline commonly occurs at high concentrations is a double blow,” Fauth said.

VIDEO: Most ‘Fintastic’ Time of Year As Discovery’s Shark Week Kicks Off TonightRelated Story:
VIDEO: Most ‘Fintastic’ Time of Year As Discovery’s Shark Week Kicks Off Tonight

“We have to act now,” Fauth said. “It is simple things like not using chemicals that harm our coral. Wear rash guards or go without sunscreen during dives. And it is making a serious commitment to conservation and management of our reefs.”

“Coral reefs are the world’s most productive marine ecosystems and support commercial and recreational fisheries and tourism. We want to do everything we can to ensure that the underwater beauty we see today is around for generations to come.”

CLICK HERE FOR BREVARD COUNTY NEWS 


Click here to contribute your news or announcements Free