VIDEO: NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory Watches Bursts Of Solar Material

By  //  July 24, 2016

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SDO CAPTURES IMAGES more than once per second

ABOVE VIDEO: Solar material repeatedly bursts from the sun in this close-up captured on July 9-10, 2016, by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO (NASA.Gov Video)

BREVARD COUNTY • KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLORIDA – Solar material repeatedly bursts from the sun in this close-up captured on July 9-10, 2016, by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.

The sun is composed of plasma, a gas in which the negative electrons move freely around the positive ions, forming a powerful mix of charged particles.

Each burst of plasma kicks out from the surface only to withdraw back into the active region – a dance commanded by complex magnetic forces above the sun.

SDO captured this video in wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light, which are typically invisible to our eyes. The imagery is colorized here in red for easy viewing.

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Speaking of the Solar Dynamic Observatory, which provides incredibly detailed images of the whole sun 24 hours a day, February 11, 2016 marked six years in space for the fastest camera around. In a bonus video, here are some of the most amazing images captured during it’s first five years in space.

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ABOVE VIDEO: Capturing an image more than once per second, SDO has provided an unprecedentedly clear picture of how massive explosions on the sun grow and erupt ever since its launch on Feb. 11, 2010. (NASA video)


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