VIDEO: True Nile Crocodiles Found In Florida Swamps, Why Are They 6,000 Miles From Home?

By  //  August 10, 2016

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confirmed BY DNA analysis

ABOVE VIDEO: Scientists are puzzled as to how the African reptiles made their way to the Florida Everglades. (FoxNews video)

An estimated 200 people a year meeting their demise in the jaws of a Nile crocodile.

Florida has further burnished its reputation for exotic, and deadly, wildlife with the discovery of three Nile crocodiles near Miami – a good 6,000 miles from where the huge predators are normally found.

DNA analysis has confirmed that three animals captured in south Florida between 2009 and 2014 are true Nile crocodiles. The reptiles can grow up to 20 feet long, weigh as much as a small car and have a reputation for being ferocious man-eaters, with an estimated 200 people a year meeting their demise in the jaws of a Nile crocodile.

The crocodiles, normally found in sub-Saharan African marshes, swamps and rivers, aren’t fussy over their dining options, tucking into zebras, porcupines, small hippos and other crocodiles that cross its path.

CLICK HERE to read the entire story on theguardian.com>>>

Scientists are puzzled as to how the African reptiles made their way to the Florida Everglades. (FoxNews video image)

Scientists are puzzled as to how the African reptiles made their way to the Florida Everglades. (FoxNews video image)


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