NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Notices A Potential Impact Crater

By  //  April 5, 2017

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Delicious Digg This Stumble This

This image from the HiRISE instrument on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter was acquired to take a closer look at a circular feature that might be an impact structure on the South Polar layered deposits. (NASA Image)

(NASA) – This image from the HiRISE instrument on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter was acquired to take a closer look at a circular feature that might be an impact structure on the South Polar layered deposits.

Measuring the sizes and frequency of impact craters provides a constraint on the age of the landscape. However, craters in icy terrain are modified by processes that flatten and change them in such a manner that it is hard to say for sure if it had an impact origin.

The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 49.8 centimeters (19.6 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 150 centimeters (59 inches) across are resolved.] North is up.

The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

NASA: Cassini Spacecraft Mission Prepares For ‘Grand Finale’ at Saturn, Orbited Around Saturn Since 2004Related Story:
NASA: Cassini Spacecraft Mission Prepares For ‘Grand Finale’ at Saturn, Orbited Around Saturn Since 2004

Click here to contribute your news or announcements Free