NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory Captures Trio of Solar Flares

By  //  April 3, 2017

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Delicious Digg This Stumble This

The sun emitted a trio of mid-level solar flares on April 2-3, 2017. The first peaked at 4:02 a.m. EDT on April 2, the second peaked at 4:33 p.m. EDT on April 2, and the third peaked at 10:29 a.m. EDT on April 3. (NASA Image)

(NASA) – The sun emitted a trio of mid-level solar flares on April 2-3, 2017. The first peaked at 4:02 a.m. EDT on April 2, the second peaked at 4:33 p.m. EDT on April 2, and the third peaked at 10:29 a.m. EDT on April 3.

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured images of the three events. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation.

Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth’s atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however — when intense enough — they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

To see how this event may affect Earth, please visit NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center at http://spaceweather.gov, the U.S. government’s official source for space weather forecasts, alerts, watches and warnings.

VIDEO: ‘Space to Ground’ Episode Features NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson’s Record Breaking SpacewalkRelated Story:
VIDEO: ‘Space to Ground’ Episode Features NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson’s Record Breaking Spacewalk

The first April 2 flare was classified as an M5.3 flare, while the second April 2 was an M5.7 flare. The April 3 flare was classified as an M5.8 flare. M-class flares are a tenth the size of the most intense flares, the X-class flares.

The number provides more information about its strength. An M2 is twice as intense as an M1, an M3 is three times as intense, etc.

The sun emitted a trio of mid-level solar flares on April 2-3, 2017. (NASA Image)


Click here to contribute your news or announcements Free