Cocoa Police Officer Luis Hernandez Saves Life of Gunshot Victim Using Tourniquet, Training Provided By Health First

By  //  November 22, 2017

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victim airlifted to hospital where he is recovering

ABOVE VIDEO: Meet Cocoa Police Officer Luis Hernandez. He is a native of Cuba and as luck would have it, his mother won the Cuban lotto in 2001, which allowed him to move to the USA. According to trauma doctors at the hospital, Officer Hernandez’s action of applying a tourniquet to the lower extremity of a wounded man was a “key link in the chain of survival for the patient.”

BREVARD COUNTY • COCOA, FLORIDA – A quick-thinking Cocoa police officer in the midst of a critical incident response is being credited with helping save the life of a man who was shot multiple times.

“On November 11, just after 4 a.m., Cocoa Police Officers Luis Hernandez and Jerry Nava responded to the 600-block of Peachtree Street for reports of a shooting,” said Cocoa Police Public Information Officer Yvonne Martinez.

“When the officers arrived at the scene they found a 44-year-old man on the ground.”

Martinez said the man, whose name is being withheld to protect the ongoing investigation, was bleeding from multiple areas of his body after being shot at least half a dozen times. Officer Hernandez applied a tourniquet to the man’s left leg to slow the bleeding.

The man was later airlifted to the hospital where he is recovering. According to the trauma doctors at the hospital, Officer Hernandez’s action of applying a tourniquet to the lower extremity was a “key link in the chain of survival for the patient.”

Cocoa Fire Rescue, Brevard County Fire Rescue and Health First’s First Flight team also participated in providing care to the wounded man.

In 2016 every Cocoa police officer was provided a tourniquet to be included as part of the first responder’s “tool” belt. Health First also provided first aid training in bleeding control concepts to the officers who typically get to an injured person or injured officer minutes before medical personnel.

In 2016 every Cocoa police officer was provided a tourniquet to be included as part of the first responder’s “tool” belt. Health First also provided first aid training in bleeding control concepts to the officers who typically get to an injured person or injured officer minutes before medical personnel.

The tourniquet is a compressing device used to control arterial and venous blood flow to a portion of the extremity for a period of time. In the case of the shooting victim, those minutes can make the difference between whether the victim survives.

“We value our partners in critical incident response,” said Chief Mike Cantaloupe.

“We put a lot of emphasis on training and tools that equip our officers so they can have the best chance to really help someone in need. In this case, the officers and other first responders did what they were all trained to do and it helped save this man’s life.”

As part of the partnership with Health First, once an officer uses his tourniquet, Health First will replace it. The training the officers received later resulted in the Health First’s implementation of a National program now known as “Stop the Bleed.”

Health First also uses this program to train civilians who are interested. To learn more visit www.hfsaves.org

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