Bones Discovered On Pacific Island Nikumaroro are ‘99% Certain’ to Be Amelia Earhart, According To Scientist

By  //  March 7, 2018

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disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean during an attempted round-the-world flight in 1937

Ever since Amelia Earhart vanished in 1937, there have been various competing theories about what happened to her and how she, navigator Frank Noonan, and her Lockheed Electra vanished while attempting to fly from Lae to Howland Island. For decades, the prevailing theory was that the Electra had run out of fuel and simply crashed into the sea. But over the last thirty years, TIGHAR (The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery) has been documenting and presenting evidence that Earhart actually landed on Gardner Island (now known as Nikumaroro). A new photo claims to present evidence that conflicts with that hypothesis, but presents it rather poorly.

DAILYMAIL.COM – The decades-old mystery over the disappearance of Amelia Earhart has been cracked with 99% certainty, according to a top scientist probing the case.

The famous aviator disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean during an attempted round-the-world flight in 1937.

Earhart, her plane and her navigator, Fred Noonan, were never found, and the mystery of what happened to them continues to fascinate to this day.

But now an expert on skeletal biology, Richard Jantz of the University of Tennessee Knoxville, believes he has cracked the case – claiming bones found on a Pacific island are ‘99% likely’ to be hers.

In 1940, bones were discovered on Gardner Island – now called Nikumaroro – 400 miles south of Earhart’s planned stopover on Howland Island.

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Newly Found Photo Suggests Aviator Amelia Earhart, Navigator Fred Noonan May Have Survived Plane CrashRelated Story:
Newly Found Photo Suggests Aviator Amelia Earhart, Navigator Fred Noonan May Have Survived Plane Crash

In 1940, bones were discovered on Gardner Island – now called Nikumaroro – 400 miles south of Earhart’s planned stopover on Howland Island.

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