How to Bid for an Aviation Cleaning Project

By  //  December 13, 2019

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Precision cleaning is a functional imperative when it comes to aviation. Not only is a clean aircraft easier to operate, but also ensures a longer life span from hardware and internal components.

Precision cleaning is a functional imperative when it comes to aviation. Not only is a clean aircraft easier to operate, but also ensures a longer life span from hardware and internal components.

Winning bids for ongoing contracts can, therefore, generate a secure long-term source of income and profit for your company.

Of course, delivering precision cleaning services means winning the bid first.

That requires putting forth the most competitive quotes to hiring organizations without undercutting your bottom line. Here is everything you need to know to bid on an aviation precision cleaning project successfully.

Take the time to research the aviation organization like CP Aeronautics –  American Built, Combat Proven, End-To-End UAS Solutions for example, and make in-roads if possible.

Understand the Requirements

Take the time to research the aviation organization and make in-roads if possible. Finding ways to speak to the procurement manager can make a significant difference in whether or not your bid gets consideration.

Companies prefer to contact people they know. A recent study found that “60 percent of companies with a referral process experienced faster closing rates.”

One way to connect with project supervisors is to request an information packet about the company’s procurement process and bid requirements.

This packet will provide you a blueprint for the data, business history, and services required in the bid. Make sure to go through the requests line-by-line to ensure you follow the procurement process completely. 

Be Willing to Walk Away

Once you complete your research, take the time to assess whether your services and products fit the bid need. A poor fit can be detrimental to your short-term resources as well as your long-term finances.

In this case, that means focusing on service providers who need precision cleaning, like Space X, the Air Force, and even satellite producers.  

You should be able to get a feel for the fit during the research process or when you contact the procurement supervisor. This connection may come during the beginning of your bid. You should be able to accommodate overhead costs with a reasonable profit margin that doesn’t sacrifice quality.  

Research the Competition

Half the battle of winning a bid is to know yourself. The other half is to know your competition. For instance, if you are looking at precision cleaning projects for aerospace, military, and defense, you will likely compete with Astro Pak.

Knowing that their products and services focus specifically on cleaning and testing hardware and flight systems can help you formulate a competitive bid. 

If you want a leg up on the competition, submit for bid early. Hiring and procurement managers have a bias to remember the first and last things they read and hear. Because late proposals are unprofessional, submitting your bid well before the deadline can move you to the top of the pile.

Provide Alternatives

A little creativity can go a long way. While there may be a standard protocol for the bidding process, it doesn’t hurt to insert additional useful information.

For instance, you may opt to include quotes based on task-based working. This variety shows procurement supervisors different ways to leverage your products and services as well as an initiative to provide alternatives. 

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