12 New Turtles and Ducks Waddled and Swam Their Way Into Brevard Zoo’s Rainforest Revealed Aviary

By  //  January 12, 2020

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Delicious Digg This Stumble This

The ducks came to Brevard County all the way from Sacramento Zoo

Twelve new faces waddled and swam their way into the Brevard Zoo Rainforest Revealed aviary. These residents included a mix of 10 male and female fulvous whistling ducks and two male yellow-spotted river turtles. (Brevard Zoo image)

BREVARD COUNTY • MELBOURNE, FLORIDA – Twelve new faces waddled and swam their way into the Brevard Zoo Rainforest Revealed aviary.

These residents included a mix of 10 male and female fulvous whistling ducks and two male yellow-spotted river turtles.

The ducks came to Brevard Zoo all the way from Sacramento Zoo, and the turtles arrived from Palm Beach Zoo. All 12 animals are full-grown adults.

Yellow-spotted river turtles are native to the Amazon River Basin and can live up to 70 years.

The species is vulnerable to extinction due to hunting and habitat loss; however, the indigenous Yekuana people, who eat the turtles’ meat and eggs, are attempting to hunt the turtles sustainably.

Fulvous whistling ducks are found in the shallow wetlands of the Americas, Africa and Asia. Although these cinnamon-colored birds are not threatened by extinction, their populations have declined in the American southwest in recent decades.

Stop by Rainforest Revealed on your next visit to meet Brevard Zoo’s newest residents.

Fulvous whistling ducks are found in the shallow wetlands of the Americas, Africa and Asia. Although these cinnamon-colored birds are not threatened by extinction, their populations have declined in the American southwest in recent decades. (Brevard Zoo image)

Brevard Zoo Constantly Looks for Ways to Keep Animal’s Hooves HealthyRelated Story:
Brevard Zoo Constantly Looks for Ways to Keep Animal’s Hooves Healthy