Federal Trade Commission Advises You to Report Cryptocurrency Blackmail Scams

By  //  July 20, 2020

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Have you gotten one of these emails? If so, you’re not alone.

The email suddenly appears in your inbox. Someone is writing to say that they have access to your cell phone or your computer. (FTC image)

BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA – The email suddenly appears in your inbox. Someone is writing to say that they have access to your cell phone or your computer.

And they’re about to make your sensitive videos, pictures, or compromising information public. Pay them money (a ransom), they say, using a cryptocurrency, like Bitcoin, and they won’t expose the truth.

Have you gotten one of these emails? If so, you’re not alone. The email is a part of a cryptocurrency blackmail scam that’s been popping up for a while. But last month, the FTC saw another uptick in the number of reports of this scam.

We’ve said it before, but it’s always worth repeating. The person behind these emails is a scammer. Don’t pay him. He’s using threats, intimidation, and high-pressure tactics to trick you out of your money.

And while the scammer may say that he knows about an alleged affair, a video, or something else that could embarrass you if it was made public, it’s all fake. In fact, it’s also a criminal extortion attempt.

It’s really important that you report this type of scam to the FBI, right away. And once you do, remember to tell the FTC, too, at ftc.gov/complaint

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