Scientists Uncover New Clues in DB Cooper Case Looking into Algae Found on Ransom Money

By  //  August 5, 2020

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The money was found buried on the shore of Oregon's Columbia River

The FBI released these sketches after a man named D.B. Cooper hijacked a plane flying from Portland to Seattle on Nov. 24, 1971, and then parachuted out the back door with $200,000, never to be seen again. (FOX News image)

(FOX) – In a cold case for nearly 50 years ago, a scientist has uncovered new clues in the D.B. Cooper case by looking at minuscule deposits of algae on the money, according to a new study.

The research, published in Scientific Reports, looked at “diatoms,” the small deposits of algae, on the money that was found buried on the shore of the Columbia River, near Portland, Ore., in 1980, nine years after Cooper hijacked a plane with 36 passengers and later parachuted with a $200,000 ransom.

“The Cooper bill contained diatoms from summer bloom species suggesting that the money was not directly buried dry and the immersion happened months after the late November hijacking,” the study’s abstract states.

“This finding rules out of a majority of current theories related to the crime and proposes diatoms as a feasible methodology to constrain seasonal timelines in forensics.”

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