Hurricane Teddy Upgraded to a Category 3 Hurricane with Sustained Winds of 121 MPH

By  //  September 17, 2020

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no threat to brevard county, expected to approach Bermuda this weekend

The National Hurricane Center has announced Hurricane Teddy has been upgraded to a Category 3 Hurricane with sustained wins of 121 mph. (NHC image)

NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER – The National Hurricane Center has announced Hurricane Teddy has been upgraded to a Category 3 Hurricane with sustained wins of 121 mph.

Teddy is expected to approach Bermuda as a hurricane this weekend and make its closest approach to the island late Sunday or Monday.

While the exact details of Teddy’s track and intensity near the island are not yet known, the risk of strong winds, storm surge, and heavy rainfall on Bermuda is increasing.

Swells produced by Teddy are expected to affect portions of the Leeward Islands, the Greater Antilles, the Bahamas, Bermuda, and the southeastern United States late this week and into the weekend.

These swells could cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

At 5 a.m., the center of Hurricane Teddy was located about 625 miles (1010 km) east-northeast of the Lesser Antillies.

Teddy is moving toward the northwest near 12 mph (19 km/h), and this general motion is expected to continue through the weekend.

Maximum sustained winds are near 105 mph (165 km/h) with higher gusts. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles (55 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 255 miles (405 km).

Additional strengthening is forecast to occur during the next couple of days, and Teddy could become a major hurricane Thursday night or Friday.

Large swells generated by Teddy are reaching the Lesser Antilles and the northeastern coast of South America and should spread westward to the Greater Antilles, the Bahamas, Bermuda, and the east coast of the United States by the weekend.

These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Vicky has winds of 40 mph, but is expected to weaken into a tropical depression.

There is an elongated area of low pressure located a few hundred miles south-southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands, producing disorganized shower and thunderstorm activity. Environmental conditions are expected to be conducive for development during the next few days, and a tropical depression could form before upper-level winds become less favorable over the weekend. The low is forecast to move west-northwestward at 10 to 15 mph during the next several days. It has a medium chance of formatation during the next five days. (NHS image)

Elsewhere over the Atlantic basin on this Thursday morning, a well-defined low pressure system is located over the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.

The thunderstorm activity has continued to increase and become better organized, and upper-level winds are gradually becoming more conducive for development.

If this trend continues, a tropical depression or a tropical storm could form later today. It has a high (90 percent) chance of formation during the next 48 hours and five days. The low is expected to meander over the southwestern Gulf of Mexico for the next day or so before moving slowly northward to northeastward on Friday and Saturday. An Air Force Reserve reconnaissance aircraft is scheduled to investigate the disturbance this afternoon.

There is an elongated area of low pressure located a few hundred miles south-southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands, producing disorganized shower and thunderstorm activity.

Environmental conditions are expected to be conducive for development during the next few days, and a tropical depression could form before upper-level winds become less favorable over the weekend. The low is forecast to move west-northwestward at 10 to 15 mph during the next several days. It has a medium chance of formatation during the next five days.

A non-tropical area of low pressure is located over the far northeastern Atlantic Ocean several hundred miles east of the Azores. The showers and thunderstorms have become more concentrated this morning. Some additional subtropical development is possible during the next day or so as it moves east-southeastward and then northeastward at about 10 mph. The system is expected to reach the coast of Portugal late Friday. It has a low (30 percent) chance of formation during the next five days. (NHC image)

Also, a non-tropical area of low pressure is located over the far northeastern Atlantic Ocean several hundred miles east of the Azores.

The showers and thunderstorms have become more concentrated this morning. Some additional subtropical development is possible during the next day or so as it moves east-southeastward and then northeastward at about 10 mph. The system is expected to reach the coast of Portugal late Friday. It has a low (30 percent) chance of formation during the next five days.

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