Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Dead at 87 of Complications from Metastatic Cancer of the Pancreas

By  //  September 18, 2020

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died in Washington surrounded by family

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the demure firebrand who in her 80s became a legal, cultural and feminist icon, died Friday. The Supreme Court announced her death, saying the cause was complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas. (NPR image)

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the demure firebrand who in her 80s became a legal, cultural and feminist icon, died Friday at the age of 87.

The Supreme Court announced her death, saying the cause was complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas.

The court, in a statement, said Ginsburg died at her home in Washington surrounded by family.

“Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,” Chief Justice John Roberts said.

“We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her, a tired and resolute champion of justice.”

Architect of the legal fight for women’s rights in the 1970s, Ginsburg subsequently served 27 years on the nation’s highest court, becoming its most prominent member.

Her death will inevitably set in motion what promises to be a nasty and tumultuous political battle over who will succeed her, and it thrusts the Supreme Court vacancy into the spotlight of the presidential campaign.

“There are nine Supreme Court seats and they have a lifetime appointment,” said Brevard County attorney David Volk.

“Their primary role is to determine the meaning of the United States Constitution which is our primary governing document and those decisions are of massive importance in helping decide how our society is structured. The Court set boundaries such as whether our various governmental entries should be hostile towards or respectful of religion and gun ownership.

“It shapes policy guidelines and helps regulate property rights. The list goes on and on. Our President has an immense responsibility in filling a vacancy on the Court so that our national values as expressed in the Constitution are given a voice.

“My guess is that this vacancy will not be filled before the election so our choice of President matters a great deal. Most Republicans believe the court should act cautiously in making sweeping changes to our society and many Democrats view the Court as a super-legislature that should enact a progressive agenda. Your vote this fall is of course very important for this reason,” said Volk.

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