Why Sports are Coming Back Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

By  //  September 4, 2020

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The year 2020 is much different than any of us expected. From the NCAA to the Olympics, the COVID-19 pandemic has heavily affected sports. Major sports events have been canceled for the first time in decades, breaking a record in sports history. However, after months of cancellations, athletes in some parts of the world are starting to compete again. But why take the risk?

The year 2020 is much different than any of us expected and from the NCAA to the Olympics, the COVID-19 pandemic has heavily affected sports.

Major sports events have been canceled for the first time in decades, breaking a record in sports history.

However, after months of cancellations, athletes in some parts of the world are starting to compete again. But why take the risk?

Billions of Dollars Will Be Lost

It’s hard to calculate how much the sports industry will lose if events do not resume soon, but we’re talking about billions of dollars.

The sports industry is estimated to be worth $614 billion in 2022. But if sports events do not come back soon, that figure is far out of reach.

In addition, the sports industry affects other industries such as travel, hospitality, and fashion. Think about the stadium cleaners, hotdog sellers, and retailers relying on sports events to make money.

And if you plan to buy a used sports car soon (remember to always check its history report beforehand), its reselling value might be affected.

The Health Benefits of Sports

Aside from being a multi-billion dollar industry, sports are also essential for people’s health and well-being. Regular physical activity is a major component of a healthy lifestyle.

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Plus, sports help teens stay away from alcohol & drug addiction, crimes, and teenage pregnancy.

Sports also have positive, long-lasting effects on one’s mental health. It provides an avenue for athletes and non-athletes to relieve stress and reduce anxiety.

The Risk Can’t Be Avoided Unless the Pandemic Stops

Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic is not going to end anytime soon. With the coronavirus still looming around, athletes and non-athletes who participate in sports events are at risk.

In fact, athletes who recover from COVID-19 experience severe fatigue and the inability to cope with their regular training load.

Coaching staff and even sports media personnel have been infected by the coronavirus as well. While fans watching from home are safer, imagine if they decide to see their favorite teams play in person.

Simply put, the risk is still there. However, a detailed game plan reduces the risk. For instance, if you and your team are plannin

Minimizing the Risk

Unfortunately, not all sports can resume. Some sports are just riskier to play than others.

Dr. Michael Ricahrdson, the medical director of One Medical Office said, “It is still quite risky to participate in any gathering that does not allow you to socially distance and wear a mask.”

His statement was asserted by Harvard. According to them, sports organizers should see to it that the sport has the following characteristics.

First, the sport must not include close contact (wrestling vs. football). Second, the less sports gear the athletes have to use, the better. Third, while social distancing is easy for players during a game, the players who aren’t playing must observe social distancing, too.

Aside from those three, other considerations include the players’ ages, team size, physical setup, travel plans, coaching staff, and non-players.

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