6 Tips for Finding Rooms for Rent in Brooklyn Effortlessly

By  //  June 14, 2022

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The exorbitant cost of rooms for rent in Brooklyn pushes many people who stay alone to locate a roommate. A reasonably priced one-bedroom or a studio apartment is often challenging to stay in. Perhaps if you have some extra savings, you’ll have to choose between taking in a roommate, giving up your doorman building pad, or even moving to an outer borough. The good part here is that you will not be alone if you rent a room at your current location. 

Interesting Fact: In New York, 40% of adult renters have a roommate with whom they are not married or partnered (or is not their parent).

When there is a plethora of data on the internet about finding a roommate while in search of an apartment, there is less information about filling that spare room or open space in your present rental. There are variations in locating lodging and finding a companion, especially in New York City, where things are different.

So, if you’re searching for a new friend or simply sharing the rent check with someone, here are the best ways to find roommates in Brooklyn. 

1. Take recommendations from Family and friends

New York City housing is a network of relationships, whispers, and people you may know. Friends and relatives are the finest people to look for a roommate.

Request a recommendation from your friends, coworkers, and relatives, and you may get a personal reference from someone who knows a person looking for rental apartments in New York. The more individuals you connect to and notify, the more comprehensive your net can be thrown to help you find roommates in Brooklyn

2. Using Groups on Social Media

In addition to your personal ties, you may post in public Facebook Groups to find rooms for rent in Brooklyn. As Facebook has been extensively pushing its Group community, it is an excellent opportunity to find rooms for rent and potential roommates. In some of the most popular Brooklyn roommates’ Facebook Groups, mention the details of the locations you want to rent an apartment. 

There are also several social groups on  Facebook, such as Gypsy Housing, which is exclusive and only for members of the performing arts community, with sub-groups dedicated to the boroughs outside of Manhattan. Another Facebook approach is to look for roommate-finder gatherings in your area and talk with people in person.

Depending on the scale of your network, social media could be a great place to look for a roommate. Like your real-life family and friends, your Facebook acquaintances, LinkedIn connections, and Twitter followers may know someone seeking a place to live. The benefit of using social media is that you can seek help from someone you’ve never met in person – whether from work, childhood, or a random acquaintance.

2. Talking to the Community of expats in Brooklyn

New York City is a choice of stay for almost 3 million immigrants, including naturalized citizens, legal residents, and legal immigrants, with more arriving day after day. If you’re not a native English speaker and are a non-US citizen or resident, checking out your home country’s expat community is an excellent way to find roommates in Brooklyn. Imagine the assistance you might provide a newbie from your nation in navigating life in the United States and providing them with a safe place to reside.

3. For Senior citizens,

Young and professional people aren’t the only ones looking for roommates in Brooklyn. Many older New Yorkers are taking in roommates to help with rent and bills, daily activities such as lifting and cleaning, or simply for post-widow company. 

The New York Foundation for Senior Citizens’ Home Sharing Program, a specialty group, assists seniors in locating roommates; however, you must be over the age of 60.

4. Taking benefit of Alumni networks at colleges

Your institution’s alumni network might be a goldmine for rental rooms and roommate hunters. Most local New York institutions have an active alumni club, or at the very least an active Facebook page or website where graduates can network, and several larger out-of-state schools even have New York-based organizations.

Post on the alumni club’s Facebook page that you have a suitable room available for someone looking forward to sharing the rent. Alternatively, contact the club’s offices or president and inquire about having your room availability announced on Twitter or their online newsletter.

You have even more options to network and locate a new roommate if you participated in sports in college, pledged a sorority or fraternity, marched in the marching band, or joined a campus group. Contact that network and ask them to help you spread the message.

5. Using dating apps 

If you use dating apps, mention that you’re seeking a roommate in your profile, and you might get matched with someone who might also be looking for a roommate. That might not be the best idea, but because numerous sites have integrated non-dating features like job finding and BFF search into their apps, using such tools to find roommates can be a good idea.

Conclusion

Finding roommates or rooms for rent in Brooklyn may appear to be a challenging endeavor. However, many resources can facilitate you in this regard. Remember to conduct due diligence by conducting personal interviews and running a basic background check to ensure that you choose an appropriate roommate.

You can use good websites, apps, and connections to find rental homes and roommates. These sources can help you find individuals looking to split the rent and cut expenses. Talk to them and discuss the share of the rent and facilities in the rental apartment.

Remember that, even if you’re only renting one room, you have the same basic rights as any other tenant. Knowing your rights and laws can help you avoid many unpleasant situations with your landlord and roommates. The laws governing tenants and landlords differ from state to state. Check New York’s real estate and accommodation laws to stay abreast of the rules you and your landlord or roommate must adhere to without infringing on each other’s rights.