Health: Quality Over Quantity: What We Can Learn From the Eating Habits of the French

By  //  November 28, 2019

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When it comes to food and conscious eating, the French are in a league of their own. Instead of chowing down on fast food, they use the highest-quality ingredients to prepare the type of dishes that can be enjoyed over extended dinners.

When it comes to food and conscious eating, the French are in a league of their own. Instead of chowing down on fast food, they use the highest-quality ingredients to prepare the type of dishes that can be enjoyed over extended dinners.

“Mealtimes in France are a ritual and a pleasure to be savored,” says nutrition expert from GUIDEDUSUPPLEMENT Julien Allard.

“As such, it is little wonder that the French enjoy relatively good health in a world where many have to take supplements to compensate for nutritional shortcomings,” With this in mind, here are a few French eating habits that are guaranteed to help you achieve mental and physical well-being.

Smaller Portions 

When it comes to staying slim and terrific, portion control matters. The French tend to eat smaller portions of better quality food than their American counterparts.

In fact, a research study conducted by Paul Rozin a psychologist with the University of Pennsylvania, found that a tub of yogurt in Philadelphia was 82 percent larger than its equivalent in Paris, a hot dog was 63 percent larger and a soft drink 52 percent larger. Considering that most of us are conditioned to eat whatever amount is in front of us, it is wise to think about portion sizes while preparing your food. 

Keep it Simple

The French eat considerably less processed and fried foods, sticking to simple diets rich in cheese, eggs, yogurt, pasta, seafood, bread and animal fat.

They also consume a lot of fresh fruit and vegetables. At the same time, they don’t deprive themselves of treats such as chocolate and pastries (all in moderation, of course). In addition, a lot of the ingredients in French cooking are local and seasonal, which means no frozen food.

Take Your Time

For the French, mealtime is a priority. Unlike Americans, where fast food prevails and meals are often eaten in front of the TV, many French families still sit down at the dinner table to eat.

Talking during dinner slows down the pace of eating, which means that you are likely to have more time to realize when you are full. If you happen to be eating alone, put on some good music to help you relax and slow down.

Enjoy a Glass of Wine

Many French drink wine with their meals—mealtimes in the European country are definitely not used for a guzzling a beer or two.

Pairing food with wine has numerous health benefits, when both are consumed in moderation. Red wine has been found to be good for heart health and blood pressure.

It can also improve lung function and help to prevent certain types of cancer. To reap maximum benefits, do not overindulge or drink on an empty stomach as this can lead to eating more than planned. 

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