UPDATE: Ocearch.org Removes Great White Shark ‘Cabot’ Ping In Indian River Lagoon

By  //  April 25, 2020

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SPACE COAST DAILY EDITORS SEEK CLARIFICATION FROM Ocearch.org officials

UPDATE: APRIL 25, 2020, 8:30 P.M.

Space Coast Daily posted the below story about “Cabot,” an almost 10-foot long Great White Shark, at 5 p.m. on April 25, 2020, with information and images directly from www.Ocearch.org

Please note the images below confirm Ocearch.org‘s information as of April 25, 2020, at 5 p.m.

Since that time, Ocearch.org has removed the below “ping” information in the Indian River, showing the last notation of Cabot was on March 12 off the Brevard County Coast.

Space Coast Daily editors have emailed Ocearch.org officials for an explanation of why Cabot’s ping in the Indian River has since been removed from their website.

STAY TUNED TO SPACE COAST DAILY FOR UPDATES

On Saturday at 11:14 p.m. www.Ocearch.org  pinged “Cabot,” an almost 10-foot long, 530-pound Great White Shark in the Indian River just north of State Road 528. CLICK THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE
On Saturday at 11:14 p.m. www.Ocearch.org  pinged “Cabot,” an almost 10-foot long, 530-pound Great White Shark in the Indian River just north of State Road 528. CLICK THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE

ORIGINAL POST: APRIL 25, 2020, 5 P.M.
10-Foot Great White Shark ‘Cabot’ Spotted In Indian River Lagoon Near State Road 528 and Cocoa

ABOVE VIDEO: ‘Cabot’ was recorded as a 9-foot-eight inch, sub-adult white shark when it was tagged October 5, 2018, in Nova Scotia.

A near 10-foot male Great White Shark named ‘Cabot’ has registered inside the Indian River Lagoon near SR 528 in Cocoa on Saturday, according to Ocearch. (Ocearch Image)

BREVARD COUNTY • COCOA, FLORIDA – Surprise Brevard County! A near 10-foot male Great White Shark named ‘Cabot’ has registered inside the Indian River Lagoon near SR 528 in Cocoa on Saturday, according to Ocearch.

The ‘ping’ came in at 11:14 a.m. on Saturday which registers a satellite tracker attached to the shark’s dorsal fin when it breaks the surface of the water.

‘Cabot’ was recorded as a 9-foot-eight inch, sub-adult white shark, and weighing in around 533-pounds when it was tagged October 5, 2018 in Nova Scotia.

Ocearch’s partner, SeaWorld, named him using suggestions from Nova Scotians after the explorer John Cabot.

Since being tagged in 2018, ‘Cabot’ has logged more than 6,700 miles of distance covered.

This is the first known recording of an Ocearch tagged Great White Shark pinging inside the Indian River Lagoon, since Ocearch began tagging sharks in 2007.

A near 10-foot Great White Shark named ‘Cabot’ has registered inside the Indian River Lagoon near SR 528 in Cocoa on Saturday, according to Ocearch. (Ocearch Image)

The Carcharodon carcharias species was made famous by the bestselling novel Jaws by Peter Benchley and the subsequent blockbuster film by Steven Spielberg depicted the great white shark as a ferocious man-eater.

Humans are not the preferred prey of the great white shark, but, nevertheless, the great white is responsible for the largest number of reported and identified fatal unprovoked shark attacks on humans.

What does OCEARCH do that is so unique?

OCEARCH is a data-centric organization built to help scientists collect previously unattainable data in the ocean while open sourcing our research and explorations. Open sourcing and inclusion at every level, and in real-time, allows the world to participate in our projects while being aware of the developing science.

Why is the research important?

Global conservation and public safety requires data that does not currently exist

What happens with the studies?

Several peer-reviewed papers have been published based on OCEARCH expeditions and resulting studies, and there are more in preparation. The studies, once published, become a basis for informed policy and management decisions.

What happens to the data you’ve collected?

We share the data, including samples collected and tracking data, with collaborating institutions and students who request them for their studies. The tracking data is also open-sourced to the public via the OCEARCH Tracker.

The ‘ping’ came in at 11:14 a.m. on Saturday which registers a satellite tracker attached to the shark’s dorsal fin breaks the surface of the water. (Ocearch Image)

ABOUT OCEARCH

OCEARCH is a recognized world leader in generating critical scientific data related to tracking (telemetry) and biological studies of keystone marine species such as great white and tiger sharks, in conjunction with conservation outreach and education at a measurable global scale.

In a collaborative environment established by Founding Chairman and Expedition Leader Chris Fischer, OCEARCH shares real-time data through OCEARCH’s Global Shark Tracker, inspires current and future generations of explorers, scientists, and stewards of the ocean, and enables leading researchers and institutions to generate previously unattainable data. OCEARCH has completed 26 worldwide expeditions.

In 2015, OCEARCH open sourced the data on the Global Shark Tracker to 2.3 million users, achieved an annual global reach of more than 12.2 billion media impressions, a Facebook reach of 150 million impressions, and a Twitter reach of 36 million impressions.

For more information on OCEARCH, its expeditions, and the Global Shark Tracker, contact info@ocearch.org

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