WATCH: NASA’s Mike Ciannilli Talks About First Manned Rocket Launch From U.S. Soil Since 2011

By  //  May 27, 2020

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Ciannilli oversees NASA'S Columbia Research and Preservation Office

 

ABOVE VIDEO: PART 3….Ready for the big launch next Wednesday at 4:33 pm when two heroic US astronauts head to the Space Station on the Falcon 9 by SpaceX? NASA Lessons Learned Director, Mike Cianilli, talks with Giles Malone, about NASA’s manned space flight then and now.

ABOVE VIDEO: PART 2….Ready for the big launch next Wednesday at 4:33 pm when two heroic US astronauts head to the Space Station on the Falcon 9 by SpaceX? NASA Lessons Learned Director, Mike Cianilli, talks with Giles Malone, about NASA’s manned space flight then and now.

SPACE COAST DAILY TV: PART 1…NASA’s Mike Ciannilli talks about the first manned rocket launch From U.S. soil since 2011. Are you excited for the May 27 launch of two American astronauts, speeding to the Space Station on an American rocket, from American soil? Michael “Mike” Ciannilli, “Apollo, Challenger, Colombia Lessons Learned” NASA Program Manager, talks with Space Coast Daily’s Giles Malone about his experiences and his responsibilities for innovatively and effectively sharing the lessons of the past to help ensure future success. All images and videos shown were obtained and chosen by Space Coast Daily.

NASA’s Mike Ciannilli talks about the first manned rocket launch From U.S. soil since 2011.   Ciannilli is the agency’s manager of the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program.

He assumed this role in 2016 and is responsible for innovatively and effectively sharing the lessons of the past to help ensure future success.

As manager of this agency-level program, Ciannilli oversees the Columbia Research and Preservation Office, which preserves all Columbia artifacts, as well as the loan program, which loans out Columbia artifacts for research and academic purposes.

In addition, this role involves giving lessons learned tours for NASA engineers, scientists, interns, executives, commercial partners and others.

During these tours, he uses the stories of Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia to share what has been learned from these past mishaps to prevent reoccurrence in future applications.

Ciannilli also does lessons learned events at Kennedy Space Center where he works to bring these past experiences and the emotions behind the accidents alive through multimedia and storytelling; these events will be expanding across the agency.

NASA astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley entered quarantine Wednesday, May 13, in preparation for their upcoming flight to the International Space Station on NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission.
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In addition to his main activities supporting the agency, Ciannilli also collaborates with outside media organizations like National Geographic to share these lessons learned with a wider audience.

Prior to his current role, Ciannilli was the lead of the Columbia Research and Preservation Office, a position that is now encompassed in his new role.

He also led the creation and development of the Forever Remembered project for Columbia and Challenger at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.

Previously, he served nine years as NASA Test Director for the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy, responsible for processing oversight of the space shuttle orbiters and ground support systems including launch and landing facilities.

In addition, this responsibility included leading the launch team through launch countdown activities. He also was the Landing Recovery Director during that time, responsible for leading contingency operations during launch countdown and landing activities, including flight crew recovery.

In 2003, during the Columbia accident recovery, Ciannilli flew extensively onboard helicopters across Texas supporting air search operations and Columbia artifact recovery.

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Before joining NASA in 2005, Ciannilli was a contractor for the United Space Alliance where he spent eight years as a Test Project Engineer, leading the testing and engineering integration during the processing of the shuttles and launch operations, and before that he was the lead of the Launch Countdown Simulation Team, which developed simulations to train the launch team.

As the simulation lead for the Mission Management Team, he also trained the leadership of the Space Shuttle Program. Prior to this he worked as a fuel cell systems engineer assigned to Columbia. He also worked as an intern for Pan Am World Services at Cape Canaveral Air Force Base and taught high school.

He has received numerous awards throughout his career, including the astronauts’ Silver Snoopy, NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal, NASA Program Leadership Award, Launch and Landing Leadership Award, Launch Countdown Simulation Contingency Leadership Award, NASA Quest Outreach Award and a Columbia Recovery Team Award, among many others.

Ciannilli has a Bachelor of Science in space science from the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida.

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