VIDEO: TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE

By  //  April 15, 2014

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Delicious Digg This Stumble This

ABOVE LIVESTREAM: It’s not often that we get a chance to see our planet’s shadow, but a lunar eclipse gives us a fleeting glimpse. During these rare events, the full Moon rapidly darkens and then glows red as it enters the Earth’s shadow. Though a lunar eclipse can be seen only at night, it’s worth staying up to catch the show. The lunar eclipse visible from the western hemisphere took place in the early morning hours of April 15 from about 2 a.m. – 5:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT).

Spring is here and ready to capture the world’s attention with a total lunar eclipse.

A total lunar eclipse will begin early on the morning of April 15 at approximately 2 a.m. (NASA image)

A total lunar eclipse will begin early on the morning of April 15 at approximately 2 a.m. (NASA image)

NASA – The eclipse began early on the morning of April 15 at approximately 2 a.m.  

In conjunction, yesterday NASA hosted two events for NASA moon experts to answer your questions. NASA planetary scientist Renee Weber took your questions via a Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything).

NASA astronomer Mitzi Adams and astrophysicist Alphonse Sterling also answered questions in a live web chat yesterday and continued through the end of the eclipse at approximately 5 a.m. EDT this morning.

The above Ustream is a replay of the lunar eclipse, courtesy of Marshall Space Flight Center.

BELOW VIDEO: It’s not often that we get a chance to see our planet’s shadow, but a lunar eclipse gives us a fleeting glimpse. During these rare events, the full Moon rapidly darkens and then glows red as it enters the Earth’s shadow. Though a lunar eclipse can be seen only at night, it’s worth staying up to catch the show. 

Loading the player ...

Click here to contribute your news or announcements Free