STUNNING HURRICANE IMAGES: NASA Gets Nighttime and Daytime Look at Irma

By  //  September 12, 2017

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tropical-storm-force winds extend out to 415 miles

SCARY STORM: NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured this night-time infrared image of Hurricane Imra on Sept. 11, 2017 at 3:21 a.m. located over Brevard County. (NOAA/NASA Goddard Rapid Response Team image)

BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA (NASA) – NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured a night-time look at Hurricane Irma over Brevard County, and the GOES East satellite provided a daytime view, as the large storm engulfed the entire state of Florida.

At 3:21 a.m. EDT on Sept. 11, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite provided an night-time infrared image of Irma.

The VIIRS image also shows the large extent of Irma over Florida, Georgia, Alabama and the Carolinas.

After sunrise, NOAA’s GOES East satellite provided a daytime look at Tropical Storm Irma as it continued to move north up the Florida Peninsula.

The National Hurricane Center said that tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 415 miles  from the center. That makes the storm more than 830 miles in diameter since the cloud cover extends farther out than the tropical storm-force winds.

VIDEO: International Space Station Passes Over Record-Setting Hurricanes Irma and Jose On FridayRelated Story:
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In this daytime view, NOAA’s GOES East satellite shows Tropical Storm Irma still over the Space Coast on Sept. 11 at 10:45 a.m. with its cloud cover extending far into the southern U.S. (NASA/NOAA GOES Project image)

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