NAT GEO: Invasive Iguana Hunters Skewer Reptiles’ Skulls with Captive Bolt Guns

By  //  March 13, 2018

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'Most of what we're doing is blunt force trauma'

There’s a bounty out for iguanas’ heads in southeastern Florida. A team of 15 researchers from the University of Florida have been hunting down invasive iguanas with captive bolt guns as part of a three-month, $63,000 research project. (Wikipeda image)

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC – There’s a bounty out for iguanas’ heads in southeastern Florida.

A team of 15 researchers from the University of Florida have been hunting down invasive iguanas with captive bolt guns as part of a three-month, $63,000 research project.

Contracted by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the project aims to remove the rampant reptiles. It will run until May.

In addition to skewering the reptiles’ skulls with captive bolt guns, which are used to stun or kill commercial livestock, the team is also smashing the iguana’s heads against solid objects, like the truck and boat they use to hunt the lizards down.

“Most of what we’re doing is blunt force trauma,” wildlife biologist Jenny Ketterlin tells Broward County’s Sun-Sentinel.

CLICK HERE to read the entire story on NationalGeographic.com>>>

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