Scientists Discover Fossils of ‘Godzilla Shark’

By  //  May 19, 2014

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Delicious Digg This Stumble This

found in Mountains east of Albuquerque

ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO — Paleontologist John-Paul-Hodnett informed Discovery News a 300-million-year-old shark, dubbed “Godzilla shark,” has been found in the Monzano Mountains east of Albuquerque.

Image courtesy of Discover News

Paleontologist John-Paul-Hodnett informed Discovery News a 300-million-year-old shark, dubbed “Godzilla shark,” has been found in the Monzano Mountains east of Albuquerque. (Image courtesy of Discover News)

Fossils were discovered the same week as the blockbuster remake of the movie that inspired the shark’s namesake. Below is an excerpt from Discovery News’ article:

Hodnett explained: “We are calling it Godzilla-shark for a number of physical features: 1) the dorsal fin spines on our shark are huge relative to the rest of the body, like those seen on the back of Godzilla, 2) Like Godzilla, it has broad, short and sharp teeth, rather than long needle-like teeth seen in other sharks of that same time period, 3) the body was largely covered by coarse dermal denticles, giving it almost a reptilian feel when you look at the fossil (like the skin of a gila monster), and 4) compared to the rest of the fish and other creatures found at the locality, its huge!”

He continued, “The average size fish (from the site) is just shy of being seven inches long. The largest shark fossil before the discovery of this new specimen was just shy of being a foot and a half long. Godzilla-shark was between seven to nine feet in length, and would have terrorized the other relatively tiny critters of the locality.”

RELATED CONTENT: Scientists: More Great Whites Are Migrating Off Florida


Click here to contribute your news or announcements Free